Apna Punjab Has Turned Into A Drug State

Posted on 11 May 2011 by admin

As I tell this sad story, I can’t help but think how ironic the situation is. For youth like myself who have been accustomed to western society, the reality is our culture has already been diluted. Although our parents do their utmost best to teach us the morals and values that reflect our heritage, the country they once idolized is now the one suffering, and in need of some kind of rescue.

My Nanaji came to settle in England in 1961, but by the 1990s as time progressed, he didn’t have the same feeling whilst going back to visit. Punjab wasn’t the home he had left 30 years ago. His village wasn’t as close-knit as it used to be, everything was expanding, technology was progressing; it just wasn’t home anymore. The reasons for my Nanaji not wanting to go back to Punjab, almost 20 years ago, are far more innocent in comparison to the way this developing state is functioning today.

For many years, the state of Punjab has been in the midst of a drug addiction crisis. According to a documentary titled “Glut-The Untold Story of Punjab,” 73.5 per cent of Punjab’s youth are addicted to drugs. The documentary goes on to talk about those individuals who are addicted to heroin, even those who inject various alternatives to satisfy their cravings. The population demographic influenced by these drugs also include farmers who are escaping debt worries, by using the dangers of these drugs to potentially end their lives,  and Punjab’s rich, who turn to drugs as a mere passtime.

The documentary interviews a widow named Namho, who lives in one of Punjab’s villages. She lost her husband due to drug addiction, along with six of her seven children. Namho was in her late fifties, but looked much older, and extremely frail. You couldn’t help but feel sorry for her, as she cried through her words, “This isn’t life. This isn’t life.”

The current crisis in Punjab is the shocking reality that many are facing, occuring in one of the world’s most culturally preserved places. Drug trafficking and high rates of youth drug addiction is happening under the nose of the government and authorities, despite their efforts to ban these drugs.

As I tell this sad story, I can’t help but think how ironic the situation is. For youth like myself who have been accustomed to western society, the reality is our culture has already been diluted. Although our parents do their utmost best to teach us the morals and values that reflect our heritage, the country they once idolized is now the one suffering, and in need of some kind of rescue.

The desire for people living in India to look and act more “westernized” has taken a turn for the worse. If citizens don’t realize that they are slowly losing their culture and values, Punjab will definitely lose its status as one of the most reputable states in India.

By Priyanka Jain

Toronto

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