Archive | Health & Fitness

ADDING THOUSANDS MORE NURSES FOR A MORE CARING ONTARIO

Posted on 17 May 2018 by admin

Premier Wynne Highlights Hiring Commitment during National Nursing Week

TORONTO — A re-elected Liberal government would add 3,500 more nurses to Ontario’s health care system this year, delivering better care for people at home and in the community.

Premier Kathleen Wynne made the announcement today at the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto, where she toured an oncology unit. The Premier was taking part in the Registered Nurses’ of Ontario Association’s “Take Your Politician to Work Day” during National Nursing Week.

In the 2018 Budget, Ontario Liberals boosted hospital funding by 4.6 percent, or $822 million, this year to help ensure Ontario’s nurses have the resources they need to improve access to care and better serve patients across the province. The Liberals also committed to reaching a provincial average of four hours of care for seniors in long-term care homes, beginning with hiring one additional registered nurses for each of the province’s 627 long-term care homes.

Taken together, the Liberals are hiring 3,500 nurses this year across the health system, including 2,500 nurses in hospital settings, with a priority on hiring registered nurses.

A re-elected Liberal government is also committed to:

•          Continuing to work with nursing and health system partners to ensure nursing vacancies are filled quickly and full-time work is prioritized.

•          Continuing to make health care settings safe for patients and health care providers by implementing the recommendations of the Workplace Violence Prevention in Health Care Leadership Table.

•          Developing a health workforce planning strategy and ensure health care providers have a seat at the table.

 The Doug Ford Conservatives will cut billons from the services people depend on — like health care, education and transit – while rewarding the rich with unnecessary corporate tax cuts. The NDP have no plan to strengthen Ontario’s economy – which supports the services people depend on – and they would slam businesses with a huge tax hike. Only the Ontario Liberals will build a stronger economy that supports strong public services.

The Liberal plan expands publicly funded prescription drugs to one in two people in Ontario, makes the largest mental health care investment in Canadian history, builds a record amount of transit, boosts hospital funding, helps more people go to college or university with publicly funded tuition and lets more parents go back to work by funding preschool child care from 2 ½ to kindergarten. Ontario’s economy is the strongest it has been in two decades, but that growth and the care and services it funds are at risk this election.

 

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The Case for a National Pharmacare Program in Canada

Posted on 26 April 2018 by admin

By Sonia Sidhu, Member of Parliament for Brampton South

In 1921, it was a Canadian who discovered insulin, but a century later, it is Canadians who cannot afford the insulin they need. Before being elected to represent Brampton South, I worked in health care for a long time, and I worked as a diabetes educator for 13 years. As someone who has been engaged with the Canadian healthcare system in the past, I know too well the importance, and lifesaving capabilities, of prescription drugs. Unfortunately, 23% of Canadians reported in a 2015 Angus Reid Survey that someone in their household failed to take their prescription medications as prescribed in the last twelve months, because of the cost. Ten per cent of uninsured Canadians do not fill their drug prescriptions because they cannot afford them. The Liberal Party of Canada is even talking about it on a national policy level. Just last weekend it was rated the number one prioritized resolution at their 2018 National Liberal Convention.

I sit on the House of Commons Standing Committee on Health, and we have recently concluded and presented 2 years’ worth of consultations, witnesses, and written submissions on the topic of a national Pharmacare plan – a single payer system of public insurance coverage for prescription drugs. It is important to me that we make necessary drugs more affordable, and I believe that the solution we found, to expand the Canadian Health Act (CHA) to also require coverage of out of hospital drugs, is the best way to do it. I am very proud of this report, and believe that it is comprehensive, and can provide a permanent solution to many problems in Canada’s current healthcare system. This action would not be unprecedented, given that although the CHA does not currently require provinces and territories to cover drugs provided out-of-hospital, the provinces and territories do provide some degree of public drug coverage, usually targeted to those with the highest ratio of drug costs to income.

Despite the many benefits to Canada’s healthcare system, there are some ways in which we fall behind; drug prices in Canada are amongst the highest in the world. According to the Canadian Institute for Health Information (CIHI), the expected expenditures on all drugs dispensed outside of hospitals in 2017 is $39.8 billion. That means that on average, Canadians spend about $1,086 per year on drugs that they need to live their life to the fullest.

I also Chair the All Party Diabetes Caucus, where we work on supporting Canadians who live with diabetes with concrete action on Parliament Hill. Last year, I went on a national tour and held consultations on healthy eating and diabetes. I heard from Canadians living with diabetes from coast to coast who overwhelmingly expressed the need for more accessible treatments. A national Pharmacare program would provide that support, and our report is the first step for the national framework.

In the past, we have seen incremental and incomplete solutions to the issue of Pharmacare. Currently, 43% of out-of-hospital drug expenses are payed for by public insurance, though 22% is still out of pocket. This spending comes from various places, but includes many targeted programs, such as those for First Nations, Inuit, veterans, and federal inmates, as well as provincial programs such as catastrophic prescription drug coverage, which protects residents from drug expenses that would threaten their financial security. These targeted programs, despite providing needed services, are inefficient, and fail to provide coverage for many who need it, as well as being unable to effectively control drug costs for Canadians.

No Canadian should ever be without the medication they need to ensure the standard of life that we expect from this country. Despite the health care we currently enjoy, too many Canadians have to suffer without the prescription drugs they need simply because they cannot afford them. The Parliamentary Budget Office (PBO) estimated that establishing a national Pharmacare program would increase drug consumption by 12.5%. Our recommendations will ensure that Canadians are able to access the health care that they deserve, and that reflects the values of our country.

Sonia Sidhu is the Member of Parliament for Brampton South. She was elected on October 19, 2015 in a wave of hope, inclusivity, and positivity across the country. She sits on the House of Commons’ Standing Committee on Health, and also was appointed to sit as a member of the Special Committee on Pay Equity. She has a passion for diabetes awareness and prevention which she champions as the Chair of the All -Party Diabetes Caucus. MP Sidhu is also the General-Secretary of the Canada-India Parliamentary Friendship Group and an executive member of both the Canada-Poland and Canada-Portugal Parliamentary Friendship Groups.  She further sits as a member of the Canada-Europe Parliamentary Association, the Canada-U.S. Inter-Parliamentary Group, and the Commonwealth Parliamentary Association.

 

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Investment of $2.4 Billion in Life-Saving Care for Children

Posted on 28 March 2018 by admin

Ontario’s Hospital for Sick Children (SickKids) is already one of the world’s largest and most respected pediatric hospitals. It has transformed the lives of hundreds of thousands of children and their families across Ontario. To make sure SickKids can continue to provide the most advanced, compassionate care to children from all over Ontario, Premier Kathleen Wynne announced today that the upcoming provincial Budget will support a new Patient Care Centre at SickKids.

The Premier was joined at SickKids today by Charles Sousa, Minister of Finance, and Dr. Helena Jaczek, Minister of Health and Long-Term Care, to explain how Ontario’s investment will provide leading care for the youngest patients from all across the province.

Investing in new hospitals and the best in children’s health care is part of the government’s plan to support care, create opportunity and make life more affordable during this period of rapid economic change. The plan includes a higher minimum wage and better working conditions, free tuition for hundreds of thousands of students, easier access to affordable child care, and free prescription drugs for everyone under 25 and everyone 65 and over through OHIP+, the biggest expansion of medicare in a generation.

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First time ever, for the Islamic community in Canada, Stop Diabetes Foundation alongside Diabetes Canada launches the Ramadan Position Statement

Posted on 15 March 2018 by admin

VISION 2020 – Peel Region holds the unfortunate distinction of being the “Diabetes capital of Canada”. STOP Diabetes foundation’s (SDF) mission termed ‘SDF VISION 2020’ aims to remove this infamous #1 tag before the year 2020 by providing public health education. In addition to the mission of diabetes prevention, the foundation’s second goal is to increase the longevity for people living with diabetes by highlighting a combination of medically proven treatments and lifestyle regimen.

Tuesday, March 20th, 2018 marks another big milestone in Stop Diabetes Foundation’s timeline to reduce the epidemic of diabetes and its complications not only in the Peel region but to spread this message across Canada. On this day, SDF, in collaboration with Diabetes Canada, will launch the first-ever Canadian Ramadan Position Statement (RPS) to spread awareness and educate healthcare providers as well as the public. RPS are research-based practical guidelines developed to help people with diabetes fast safely during Ramadan. The RPS has been developed with the consensus of Canadian diabetes specialists, researchers as well as religious leaders. The plan is to have this position statement endorsed by Diabetes Canada and submitted for publication in a Canadian Medical Journal before Ramadan starts in the middle of May 2018.

Type 2 diabetes is a growing epidemic, especially in certain immigrant populations in Canada e.g. people with origins from South Asian and Middle-East Asian countries. According to national statistics, the Muslim population in Canada is steadily growing, in part fueled by immigration and higher fertility rates. One of the pillars of Islam is fasting during the month of Ramadan (from dawn to dusk). Though certain individuals are exempted from fasting (e.g. pre-pubertal children and those who are ill, pregnant or breastfeeding), many of those who fall under these categories often opt to still follow the practice. Management of diabetes (type 1 and type 2 diabetes) during Ramadan is challenging for Canadian healthcare providers because of limited research data and education around this topic. The launch of this first Canadian Ramadan position statement will potentially overcome this huge unmet need and knowledge gap.

The Canadian Ramadan Position Statement initiative will be launched at a high-level media & healthcare professional event on March 20, 2018, from 6 PM to 8 PM at Mississauga Convention center. This event will be organized by STOP Diabetes Foundation Inc. The program agenda will include Q & A style interactive engagements with the Canadian expert faculty involved with this project (Dr. Harpreet Bajaj, Dr. Tyceer Abouhassan, Dr. Amel Arnaout, Dr. Tayyab Khan, Dr. Hasnain Khandwala and Dr. Subodh Verma); Diabetes Canada scientific leaders (Dr. Jan Hux and Dr. Peter Senior), several religious leaders, community leaders and Dr. Hisham Mahmoud (Sanofi Canada). Dr. Mohamed Hassanein, chair of the International Diabetes Federation’s Diabetes and Ramadan alliance will also support this Canadian initiative via video conferencing from Dubai.

STOP Diabetes foundation looks forward to the support of local community as well as media in this benevolent cause to succeed in its fight against these important health concerns afflicting our country, and the PEEL region disproportionately and motivate everyone to live healthy and long lives.

For more information contact 647-986-7867 or www.stopdiabetesfoundation.com

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Ontario families need true, universal pharmacare now: NDP Health critic

Posted on 07 March 2018 by admin

QUEEN’S PARK: NDP Health critic France Gélinas said that Ontario families can’t afford to wait for another federal study before they get the medicine that they need and called on the Wynne government to put Ontario first and support the NDP plan for true, universal pharmacare now.

“It’s time for national, universal pharmacare — but yesterday, the federal government chose to study this idea, again, without promising any action, any money, or any timelines,” said Gélinas. “That leaves millions of Ontarians between the ages of 25 and 65 without prescription drug coverage. That leaves people sitting at their kitchen tables, cutting their pills two to make the prescription last longer.”

The NDP Pharmacare for Everyone Plan would deliver true, universal pharmacare for all Ontarians so that both parents and their children can get the medications that they need. The NDP plan would cover everyone, regardless of age, income, job status or health status.

In question period on Wednesday, Gélinas said that Ontario families can’t wait for the federal government to act, and that Kathleen Wynne’s plan to cut people off from drug coverage when they turn 25 is letting families down.

“A drug plan that cuts people off from drug coverage the day they turn 25 years old is not good enough,” said Gélinas. “Ontarians shouldn’t have to settle for a plan that leaves people from the ages of 25 to 65 with no prescription drug coverage. That’s not pharmacare — because real universal pharmacare is prescription drug coverage for everyone.”

“While the federal government continues to study pharmacare yet again, instead of acting upon it, why doesn’t this Premier have a plan for universal pharmacare right here, right now in Ontario?” asked Gélinas.

 

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Horwath demands Wynne listen to health care workers speaking out

Posted on 02 February 2018 by admin

HAMILTON – News reports Wednesday reveal that a number of doctors, nurses and administrators are speaking out about dangerous hospital overcrowding in the Greater Toronto Area. Andrea Horwath, who has been raising alarm bells about growing hospital overcrowding concerns for over a year, released the following statement in response:

“Doctors and front-line health care workers are speaking out about the dangerous situations in overcrowded hospitals, and it’s time for leadership that listens to them, and takes action. Many of our hospitals were operating above 100 per cent capacity before this winter’s flu surge – so news again this morning that more hospitals are in crisis as a result of flu-season is troubling, but not at all surprising. It’s just plain wrong that no real action has been taken to ease the squeeze on Ontario’s hospitals, putting patients at risk.

Ontario’s hospitals have faced decades of cuts – first by a Conservative government that closed 28 hospitals and fired 6,000 nurses, and then by a Liberal government that has cut or frozen budgets for years. Patients around the province, doctors, nurses, hospital administrators, the Ontario Hospital Association and the NDP and I have all been calling out for the government to listen, and make changes. But Kathleen Wynne let us down again. Long waits, overcrowding and hallway medicine have been getting worse and worse – even as hospital staff were warning that they didn’t have the resources to handle this year’s flu season.

It’s time to do something about health care overcrowding – and that means making health care funding a priority in Ontario again. Wynne’s budgets keep underfunding hospitals, and Patrick Brown is vowing to make $6.1 billion in cuts. I disagree – we can’t keep going down that road. Instead of cuts, we need to invest in shorter waits and tackling hallway medicine.

My thanks go out to the health care workers around the province who are on the front-lines of this crisis, working long hours in busy hospitals and doing everything they can do deliver the care that people deserve in Ontario.

 

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Listen to the experts, stop ignoring hospital overcrowding crisis

Posted on 22 December 2017 by admin

Horwath releases new overcrowding information for Hamilton hospital

QUEEN’S PARK – Ontario NDP Leader Andrea Horwath has been fighting to end hospital overcrowding in communities all over the province for months. On Wednesday, Horwath demanded again that Kathleen Wynne take action, just as Ontario’s Hospitals weighed in, saying that they are facing an “imminent capacity crisis.”

“Kathleen Wynne has ignored the experts repeatedly when it comes to hospital care,” said Horwath. “She refuses to listen to patients and their families. She refuses to listen to doctors, nurses and front-line health care workers. And now she’s refusing to listen to the Ontario Hospital Association. This is about patients waiting in agony, treatments being delayed and people having their health and dignity impacted by hallway medicine. This is about people’s lives. We can’t let Kathleen Wynne let us down again.”

As she has done repeatedly throughout the year, Horwath released the overcrowding numbers from yet another hospital Wednesday. Obtained via Freedom of Information laws, Horwath revealed that St. Joseph’s Health Care Hamilton was over 105 per cent occupancy every single day between June and October, reaching a high of 139 per cent. That means as many as 34 unfunded beds every day, and patients being left in spaces that don’t have access to proper washrooms or nurse call bells.

According to the Ontario Hospital Association (OHA), a substantial investment is needed to fix the crisis. The OHA released a budget submission Wednesday called A Sector on the Brink: The Case for a Significant investment in Ontario’s Hospitals.

“We know that there are already thousands of patients lining the hallways of our hospitals all across this province – and the OHA is saying that without a major investment – a major course change from the years of cuts – it will only get worse,” said Horwath.

Patrick Brown’s campaign platform vows to cut another $6.1 billion in jobs and services, and includes no investment into easing hospital overcrowding. The last Conservative government fired 6,000 nurses and closed 28 hospitals.

Horwath has committed to fund hospitals, at a minimum, to the rate of inflation, population growth and to meet the unique needs of the community around the hospital.

“Hospitals are in bad shape and patients are hurting, but it doesn’t have to be this way,” said Horwath. “We can do so much better, and families deserve to have some hope. It’s time for a premier that is focused on ending the gridlock and cutting wait times for everyone.”

 

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Majority of Torontonians with celiac disease don’t know they have it, study shows

Posted on 13 October 2017 by admin

About 1 per cent of Torontonians are estimated to have celiac disease, an autoimmune disorder triggered by gluten. Yet University of Toronto researchers found that 87 per cent of people living with celiac in Toronto aren’t aware they have the condition.

If you’ve got constant fatigue, sore muscles or unexplained gastrointestinal problems, there’s a chance you’re part of the 1 per cent of Torontonians with celiac disease — and new research shows you probably don’t know it.

Researchers at the University of Toronto found that 87 per cent of people living with celiac disease in Toronto aren’t aware they have it.

Ahmed El-Sohemy, a professor of nutritional science at the University of Toronto and senior author of the paper, said researchers compared blood tests of about 3,000 Canadians with their responses to a health questionnaire.

“We found that among those that tested positive for the blood test, 90 per cent of them indicated ‘no’ to having been diagnosed with (celiac disease),” El-Sohemy said.

Celiac disease is an autoimmune disorder triggered by eating gluten. There are essentially two types of the disease: a severe, early-onset form that is often identified in childhood by a pediatric gastroenterologist, and a less severe type that often isn’t diagnosed until adulthood.

With the latter, people “just never really felt right,” El-Sohemy said. They might experience fatigue or gastrointestinal problems, or mistake symptoms for inflammatory bowel syndrome or other autoimmune disorders.

“The symptoms are not as clear-cut as other types of disorders, where it’s perhaps more localized just to the digestive system,” El-Sohemy said.

Celiac disease causes damage to the small intestines, leading to malabsorption of nutrients and vitamin deficiencies.

That can manifest in ways seemingly unrelated to celiac disease — bleeding gums, brittle bones or weak muscles.

Celiac disease is the best-understood type of gluten intolerance, El-Sohemy said.

“This concept of non-celiac gluten sensitivity is still not very clear,” he said. “There have been a number of studies but the findings have been inconclusive, as to whether it actually exists.”

El-Sohemy suspects that the vast majority of people eating gluten-free by choice don’t actually have celiac disease.

Andrey Malkov of Hibiscus Cafe, a vegetarian and gluten-free restaurant in Kensington Market, said the majority of his customers are trying out or prefer eating gluten free.

“It’s a preference to try eating without gluten,” Malkov said. “And we do have quite a number of people coming in who do have celiac disease. I would say the majority would be people who prefer the lifestyle.”

El-Sohemy said the reason many people without celiac disease opt to eat gluten-free — including a number of prominent athletes — is that it cuts or reduces carb intake.

“They’re no longer eating heaping plates of pasta, and lots of refined white bread,” El-Sohemy said. “So they’re losing weight, they’re not getting that glucose crash after a big pasta meal, and they feel more energized and great.”

Still, El-Sohemy said it’s important to know whether the benefits of eating gluten free are because of intolerance or simply a better diet.

“There are a lot of gluten-containing whole grains that are very nutritious, have a lot of central minerals and fiber and they’re good sources of a variety of nutrients,” he said, adding they should still be consumed in moderation.

“And also, you don’t throw the baby out with the bathwater. You don’t just cut out all sources of gluten when it’s only the carbohydrates that may have been the culprit.”

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We Should Be Talking About Men’s Mental Health

Posted on 08 December 2016 by admin

By Dr. Ari Zaretsky, 

Psychiatrist-in-Chief at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre

When it comes to Movember and men’s health, the focus has typically been on prostate and testicular cancer. However, there is another common male medical condition that has been relatively overlooked: depression.

Clinical depression is a costly and debilitating condition that affects approximately five per cent of the Canadian population in any given year, and 10 per cent of Canadians over the course of a lifetime.

Although it has been commonly believed — based on community and epidemiological studies — that women are diagnosed with depression twice as often as men, this impression is more recently being brought into question.

In a 2013 article published in JAMA Psychiatry, authors explored whether sex disparities in depression rates are related to the phenomenon of men masking their depression with anger, hostility, risk taking and substance use because they believe it’s socially unacceptable to acknowledge depression publicly.

What the authors determined was surprising. When the above symptoms are considered in addition to the conventional depressive symptoms (such as sadness, loss of pleasure, self-criticism, diminished appetite) the rates of depression were no different between men and women.

Even if we put the study aside, it’s clear that depression is not exclusive to women. In fact, approximately one million Canadian men suffered from major depression in 2016 alone.

What are the consequences of untreated depression in men?

Beyond decreased quality and function of life, and potential social consequences resulting from increased anger, aggression, risk taking and substance use, untreated depression can lead to suicide.

In Canada, suicide is the leading cause of death for all men between ages 10 and 49. This is the third highest suicide rate in the industrialized world.

What role does stigma play in male depression?

Stigma and cultural expectations can lead men to mask the true symptoms of depression, impeding diagnosis and treatment.

Generally, men tend to be socialized to control their emotions and base their self-esteem on mastery, financial and occupational success, and strength. In the face of loss, failure, or other life setbacks, some men may express aggression and anger since these emotions are more socially “acceptable.”

These cultural expectations can also mask some of the common symptoms of depression. Men are more likely to deal with their depressive symptoms by drinking alcohol, using drugs or pursuing other risky behaviour. Many men also avoid talking about depressed feelings with their friends or family.

Is depression common in elderly men?

Depression is not a normal part of aging. However, specific medical conditions such as heart disease, stroke and cancer can contribute to depression, either directly (through the disease itself) or indirectly (e.g. through the medications and other treatments involved).

There are also important psychosocial factors that need to be considered in older-aged men. Retirement is difficult for many men because they lose meaningful work (an important source of self-esteem), they lose a routine, and they lose a way to organize their lives.

In addition, loss of a spouse/partner can be particularly devastating for men, as a spouse may have played a central role in organizing social networks and connections. As those networks/connections begin to deteriorate, it can result in even further isolation.

How is depression treated in men?

The general consensus is that 80 per cent of people with depression — both men and women — can be treated equally effectively with antidepressant medication, specific active forms of psychotherapy (such as cognitive behavioural therapy or interpersonal psychotherapy) or a combination of both types of treatment together.

How can you get help?

If you are feeling depressed, talk to your family doctor. S/he can help you get the help you need.

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Healthy Ways To Get Your Pre-Pregnancy Bod Back

Posted on 05 May 2016 by admin

Dr. Jennifer Pearlman B

Women’s Health, Hormone and Beauty Expert

Your little bundle of joy arrived and surprisingly weighed in at a small fraction of your total pregnancy weight gain. The numbers aren’t adding up and you may — like many moms — begin to wonder if you will ever get your body back after baby.

1. Don’t rush!
Savour the moment! Your little bundle of joy is changing by the minute — but you don’t have to. Don’t be too rushed in transforming back to your pre-pregnancy weight or shape. Just remember it took you nine long months to gain the weight — it can often take as long or longer to shed the pregnancy pounds. Stay the course with patience and determination.

2. Breast is best!

If breast feeding is an option, it is a great way to burn extra energy while bonding and feeding your newborn. Breast feeding consumes more energy than pregnancy and is a great way to help get your body back into shape. The daily caloric burn when exclusively breast feeding is 500 calories, while pregnancy burns 300 calories daily.

3. Make sleep a priority!

Sleeplessness is inevitable in the early post-pregnancy phase and can make it more difficult to lose the extra inches. Lack of sleep has been associated with poor eating habits and weight gain. Even if your nighttime sleep is disrupted, you can try to get some shuteye through out the day when your baby does. Make naps a priority. The stack of dirty dishes and pile of laundry can always wait until later.

4. Take a time out!

Time outs aren’t just for little ones. Parents may find they too need a break — even a brief reprieve from the stress of parenthood. Time outs can help us better cope with stress and keep cortisol levels controlled. Cortisol, the stress hormone, can block our best intentions around weight loss. Keeping stress at bay is good for baby and your body.

5. Get moving early on!

Invest in a good stroller with sturdy rubber wheels and equipped with a large carry basket. Pack a bag with water, diapers, and an on-the-go healthy snack like trail mix and get going!

Vary your walking route and make it purposeful by walking to do your chores with trips to the grocery store or bank. Until your baby is ready for sleep training, usually around four to five months, stroller naps are considered by most experts to be an acceptable option.

6. Rebuild your core
The stretching of the abdominal wall to accommodate a growing baby will temporarily weaken your core. In about 15 per cent of women, the abdominal muscle sheath may split during pregnancy (called a diastasis) leaving a gap through which abdominal contents can bulge or herniate.

With a diastasis present, women must be extra vigilant when starting on an exercise program and are best off avoiding exercises that excessively strain the central core muscles. Oblique curls and planks are preferred and attention must be paid to the pelvic floor.

7. Restore your floor
Further destabilizing a mommy’s middle is the combined impact of pregnancy, labour and delivery on the tone of the inner core — the pelvic floor.

But with proper diagnosis and treatment, it is possible to repair the pelvic floor. Kegel exercises are key to successful recovery. Kegels work best when co-ordinated contractions of the pelvic floor muscles are supported by activation of adjacent muscle groups like the abdominal, gluteal and leg muscles.

There are training devices and specialists that can help you further hone the perfect Kegel. Consider seeing your doctor or a women’s health expert to ensure you have properly diagnosed the problem and what type of pelvic floor rehab is right for you.

8. Eat purposefully
Plan your diet to be rich in plant-derived phytonutrients and healthy sources of protein and fat and low in potentially harmful chemicals like pesticides, added flavouring and colouring chemicals in processed foods. The addition of supplements like vitamin D3 and calcium can help meet the higher needs of breast feeding women.

9. Join a mommy group or class!

New babies and their never ending needs can lead to social isolation. Make an effort to join a new mommy group or sign up for baby programs to meet other new moms. Stroller classes and other post-pregnancy fitness programs can keep you socially connected, fit and help foster baby’s development.

10. Take care of mommy, too!

Don’t skip out on your own health needs and self-care. Take time to visit your doctor to discuss any new problems like; persistent sadness, crying, hair loss, breast or nipple pain, excessive fatigue, bladder difficulties, acne or brown spots, and sexual health problems including pain with intercourse and low libido. These are just some of the many common health concerns that can emerge in a new mom and which can be properly investigated and treated by a doctor.

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