Archive | News in Brief

Canadian involved with human smuggling arrested

Posted on 05 July 2012 by admin

A Canadian, accused of organizing the MV Sun Sea human smuggling operation has been arrested at Toronto’s Pearson airport after arriving on a flight from Germany. The RCMP had been looking for Nadarajah Mahendran since June 6, when he and two others were charged in connection with smuggling 492 Sri Lankan asylum seekers to Canada from Southeast Asia in 2010. The former Toronto convenience store owner and alleged alien smuggler had left Canada after being questioned by authorities. He traveled to Sri Lanka, his birthplace. While he was away, police issued a warrant for his arrest. He was taken into custody last Monday, after his flight landed in Toronto.

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Federal judge rules IRB erred in case of Pakistani refugee claimant

Posted on 27 June 2012 by admin

A federal judge has ruled that the Immigration and Refugee Board made a mistake in denying the claim of a Pakistani man who sought refuge in Canada on the grounds that his wife’s parents set police on him because they disapproved of their marriage. The judge said it was unreasonable for the IRB to suggest that the man could “live in hiding” in another part of Pakistan. He cited a corrupt police force and the high number of “honour crimes” committed against couples who marry in defiance of parents’ wishes in countries like Pakistan. As Nadir Saleem’s wife’s parents did not approve of their relationship, the couple fled to the city of Mardan and took refuge with the family of a friend. They married in 2007. Subsequently, his wife’s parents lodged a complaint against Saleem that resulted in charges of abduction and rape being filed against him. Saleem fled to Canada and sought protection.In reviewing his case, an IRB adjudicator suggested that Saleem could reside in the cities of Multan or Mardan — “Internal Flight Alternatives” — which are more than 400 kilometres from Sialkot.Saleem applied for a judicial review of that decision, arguing at a hearing in Calgary that it was wrong for the IRB adjudicator to suggest his in-laws and police were not actively searching for them.

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Canada best G20 country for women, India worst

Posted on 21 June 2012 by admin

 

A global poll of experts rates Canada to be the best place for a woman among the G20 countries, representing the world’s biggest economies. The poll ranked India as the worst place for women. Policies promoting gender equality, safeguards against violence and exploitation and access to healthcare put Canada on top. In contrast, infanticide, child marriage and slavery make India the worst. Conducted by TrustLaw, a legal news service run by Thomson Reuters Foundation, the poll found Germany, Britain, Australia and France to be the other countries among the top five. Saudi Arabia, where despite being educated, women are banned from driving and only recently won the right to vote stood second-worst after India, followed by Indonesia, South Africa and Mexico. TrustLaw asked aid professionals, academics, health workers, policymakers, journalists and development specialists with expertise in gender issues to rank the 19 countries of the G20 in terms of the overall best and worst to be a woman. The countries were ranked in six categories: quality of health, freedom from violence, participation in politics, work place opportunities, access to resources such as education and property rights and freedom from trafficking and slavery.

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South Asian women in Manitoba approaching private clinics for sex determination

Posted on 21 June 2012 by admin

According to a CBC News investigation, some women in Manitoba’s South Asian community are approaching private ultrasound clinics to determine the gender of their fetuses. The investigation found that some privately owned 3D ultrasound clinics in Canada allow booking an appointment that would give the gender of the fetus before 20 weeks of pregnancy, a timeframe within which it is still possible for a woman to get an elective abortion.The probe features TejBains of the Punjab Cultural Centre in Winnipeg, who says sex-selective abortions are being sought out by some women in Manitoba.UC Baby, a nationwide chain of private ultrasound clinics, maintains its clinics do not reveal fetal gender before 20 weeks of pregnancy. However, staff at the UC Baby clinic in Winnipeg told CBC News they would do an ultrasound at 17 weeks.Out of the 10 UC Baby clinics across Canada that CBC News tested, only two insisted on revealing fetal gender after 20 weeks.Officials with UC Baby expression their concern with the findings of the investigation and promise to ensure that no more women are accepted for ultrasounds before 20 weeks.

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India, Canada to promote joint research in sciences

Posted on 07 June 2012 by admin

Last week, India and Canada announced collaborative projects to promote joint research in areas of environment technology, alternative energy, IT, earth sciences and disaster management between their academic institutions and research hospitals. The projects will be jointly conducted by International Science and Technology Partnerships Canada (ISTP Canada), Global Innovation and Technology Alliance (GITA) and the Indian Department of Biotechnology (DBT), according to a statement from Canadian High Commission. As part of a new strategic initiative, Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada (NSERC) will serve as the key Canadian partner on these Calls and provide funding to academic collaborators on selected bilateral projects.

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40% below-age-one children from visible minorities by 2031

Posted on 23 May 2012 by admin

According to Statistics Canada, by 2031, nearly 40 per cent of children under the age of one in Canada will belong to a visible minority group. Only six years ago, this figure was 22 per cent. This trend reflects the one in the United States. Last week, the U.S. Census Bureau revealed a landmark demographic shift, reporting that for the first time more than half of children being born in the United States belonged to ethnic or racial minorities. Assessing similar trends in Canada, StatsCan projects that the visible minority population in this country will continue to increase by sustained immigration and slightly higher fertility rates in the next 15 years or so. The South Asian population would still be the largest visible minority group in 2031, and might more than double from roughly 1.3 million in 2006 to 4.1 million by then. The Chinese population is projected to grow from 1.3 million to 3 million, according to StatsCan estimations. For this study, the agency used the census metropolitan area of Toronto, which reaches from Oshawa in the east to Burlington in the west and Barrie in the north.

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Doctor-turned-cabbies in Canada

Posted on 16 May 2012 by admin

According to a federal immigration survey, more than 200 taxi drivers, mostly from the Toronto-area, were found to be doctors in their homelands before arriving in Canada. Last year, the department last year surveyed 50,101 cabbies, through the use of their tax forms. Another 55 Canadian-born taxi drivers were found to be doctors or to have PhDs.The study, which is one of the most comprehensive into the cab industry, found one of every two taxi drivers are immigrants and one of every three of them were born in India or Pakistan. The study results, published in Toronto Sun, have not been released publicly by Ottawa. The study shows that the most educated drivers arrive from India, Pakistan, Lebanon, Iran, the U.K., Bangladesh, Haiti and the U.S.

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Canadian photographer’s record-breaking work depicts dead Soviet soldiers in Afghanistan

Posted on 16 May 2012 by admin

Alarge-scale battlefield picture of conversing corpses by acclaimed Canadian photographer Jeff Wall has become the single most valuable photographic artwork ever produced in this country, breaking the artist’s all-time price record. The 1992 photograph is titled “Dead Troops Talk,”and depicts a group of Soviet soldiers talking to each other after being killed in the Soviet-Afghan war in 1986. It sold last week for more than $3.6 million at a Christie’s auction in New York. Wall took the photograph at a suburban Vancouver studio after arranging a group of actors dressed in military garb. “Dead Troops Talk” is hailed as the world-renowned B.C. artist Wall’s single most important creation.The fictitious image shows the unit of Red Army soldiers somehow reanimated after their deaths at the hands of rebel mujahedeen.

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Canadian employees behind China, India in Internet access, smart phones

Posted on 10 May 2012 by admin

Recent surveys conducted by international staffing firm Randstad reveal that Canadian workers are less likely to have access to the Internet at work or have a smart phone — either their own or one provided by their employer — than workers in developing countries such as China and India. The surveys found that 76 per cent of Canadian workers polled had access to the Internet at work, while in China and India, this number was 93 per cent. Other Asian countries also registered high Internet rates at work; Japan was at 83 per cent, while Malaysia was at 89 per cent. Belgium had the lowest rate among the 32 countries measured at 66 per cent. The survey found 13 per cent of Canadian workers polled were provided smart phones with email capability by their employers, while 47 per cent own their own Smart phones.

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Canada to end bilateral aid programs in eight countries

Posted on 10 May 2012 by admin

Canada will end bilateral aid programs in eight countries and refocus its efforts in five others due to “high operating costs.” The move is expected to affect some of the poorest countries in the world. The Canadian International Development Agency (Cida) will end bilateral programming where aid efforts are affected by high operating costs. These countries include Nepal, Rwanda, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Malawi, Niger, Cambodia and China. The agency will also reduce and concentrate its bilateral programming in Mozambique, Bolivia, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Pakistan. The changes are a result of the federal government’s plans to cut $319m dollars (£200m) from Cida’s funding over the next few years. More details about how the 2012 budget is to be implemented will be released in the coming weeks.

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